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Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural and Mining Advocate, Monday 31 May 1920, page 2

FROM ALL PARTS

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Binda folk presented each of their returned soldiers with a watch and chain costing £10 10s.

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The Railway Dept. announces in this issue the running of cheap trains in connection with the visit of the Prince of Wales to Sydney.

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Mr. F. Dunleavy, inspector of the Wagga Labor Exchange (says the "Advertiser") left on Thursday evening, on an official visit to Tumut, Adelong and Gundagai. The chief object of the tour is to inquire into the labor conditions prevailing at those centres. Mr. Dunleavy expects to return to Wagga on Tuesday, morning.

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Was it because a small section of the crowd hooted him as he drove behind the Prince of Wales in Melbourne on Wednesday that caused Billy Hughes to throw the vice-regal set of lancers, at the ball at night, into confusion? 'Tis said that Mr. Hughes, recalling the "stock-yard" (the last figure of the quadrilles as he danced them in the N.S.W. back-blocks over twenty years ago) romped in and swung with every available female. The Prince is said to have been flabbergasted, and kept well away from the champion peanut eater, for fear the latter might want to "promenade" with him.

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The soreheads resent it! Scambler, the chap who lost his deposit in the last Hume Federal election contest, protests against the increase in Federal salaries: —"In cynical disregard of the rights of the electors, it amounts to obscene impudence. Considering the direful state of affairs throughout the Commonwealth, resulting from the drought, war and mismanagement, this raid on the Treasury at this time by our newly elected and trusted servants is a shameful example of sordid selfishness. For such men to talk about profiteering is sickening cant and arrant hypocrisy. I expected much better things from Mr Moloney, and am very sorry indeed to feel impelled to speak out."

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The mythical Goldbrick caught Norman Mervyn Harvey, of Batlow. He was in Sydney last week and got talking with Frank and Bill Harris; at the People's Palace. They told him how Goldbrick was a sure winner of a certain race, and Normey, from Batlow, gave them £2 to put on the horse. Then Normey heard something, and set the law in motion, and the two Harris boys were brought before the court. The man from Batlow, in evidence, admitted that the men had given him back £10, which they said, represented a win of his horse, at 4 to 1. The magistrate looked hard at Normey, & then said "Discharged" to the recommenders of Goldbrick.

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Reporting the death of Mr. G. R. Barnes, of Murrumburrah, the local paper recalls how one day the notorious bushranger Ben Hall entered Barnes' store. He tried to sell a lump of metal, but without success, and he left it behind him on the counter. Some time previously the outlaw had bailed up the Royal mail, & took all the jewellery from the passengers. He secured a number of silver watches, which he melted up into one mass. For years afterwards the piece of metal was used in the store as a paper weight. The souvenir is now in the possession of Mr A. E. Barnes, solicitor, Sydney, nephew to the late G. R. Barnes.

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Never kick away the ladder which elevates you. A Galong man, Mr A. T. Cusack did so last week. He climbed a tree with the aid of a ladder to lop it for stock. When he got into the fork of the tree he accidentally kicked the ladder away. He was in the tree from 3.30 till 9 o'clock at night, and being nearly frozen, he jumped from the tree and broke his foot, and had to crawl some distance to his house. He was taken to Burrowa for medical treatment.

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Well, well, it's a funny world ! Here's our late Stock Inspector (Mr Donald Macpherson) in the role of a unionist. It was at the recent Stock Inspectors' Conference in Sydney, and Donald, brushing back his hair, moved a motion to the effect that it be a direction from this conference to the council that an industrial union of inspectors of stock be formed and registered in the Arbitration Court. In moving the resolution, Inspector Macpherson said he had no particular affection for unions, but modern conditions made it necessary for every man working for his living to join one or go under. If there was any blame attaching to the action they proposed to take it should be laid on the shoulders of the men who forced them into the position where they now stood. In spite of the stories told about him, he was really a man of peaceful and kindly disposition. (Laughter.) He detested fights, but was forced into them. It was useless for any man to talk of liberty unless he was prepared to fight for it. The inspectors would never get justice, either from the Governments or the Boards. He, personally, had more faith in a Supreme Court judge than any man on earth, & that was the man before whom they ought to take their case. The motion was carried. — The next stage will be joining up with the Trades Hall, we suppose.

 


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