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Evening News, Rockhampton Qld, Tuesday 14 April 1936, page 7

NO COMPETITION FOR WOOL FROM FAR EAST

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AUST'S TRADE SHOULD CONTINUE TO EXPAND.

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PRICE WARNING.

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SYDNEY, Monday.

Instead of being apprehensive of wool competition from the Far East, Australia should be thankful that the sheep industry is in such an extraordinarily favourable positlon today.

THIS statement was made by Dr I. Clunies Ross, D.V.S., officer in charge of the McMaster Laboratory, in an address at the annual conference of the Institute of Stock Inspectors. Dr Ross who last year toured the Far East, said that be could not envisage a major sheep industry being built up in Manchuria, Mongolia, or Korea.

Scant pastures, sandy deserts, depredations of bandits, and climatic conditions, were among the handicaps which faced wool growers in the Far East.

ROOM FOR OPTIMISM.

On the other hand, said Dr Ross, there were definite possibilities of increasing wool consumption in those countries.

The future of the wool Industry in the Far East should be regarded with positive optimism in Australia.

Given a reasonable price for raw materials he believed that trade with Japan would continue to expand for some years.

"The continual rise in Japan's standard of living means an increased demand for Australian wool," he added. "The same applies to the large Chinese cities, where there is a growing demand for woollen textiles, which are gradually taking the place of cottons and silks."

If Australia continued to aim at high prices for her wool, however, a considerable impetus would be given to the manufacture in China and Japan of substitutes.

 


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